Posts tagged "urban design"
The Atlantic Cities: 
"5 Principles for Building Greener, Healthier Cities
Kaid Benfield. Jan 13, 2014
I like to consider “people habitat” – the realm of places that humans build and inhabit – as having an ecology of its own, roughly analogous to that of natural wildlife habitat. Nature works best when it is in balance and, like the natural environment when operating at its best, the built environment created by us humans should achieve harmony among its various parts and with the larger world upon which it depends. But, while the ecology of the natural world – at least as usually studied – concerns itself primarily with the interdependence and health of non-human species, the ecology of people habitat concerns itself also with our relationships as humans to each other, and with the health of communities that support those relationships and allow us to flourish alongside and within nature. 
I believe we humans have an opportunity and a duty to make our habitat work both for us as people and for the sustainable health of the planet writ large. Indeed, if our solutions do not work for people, they will never work for the planet.”
Photo: Flick user Payton Chung.

The Atlantic Cities: 

"5 Principles for Building Greener, Healthier Cities

Kaid Benfield. Jan 13, 2014

I like to consider “people habitat” – the realm of places that humans build and inhabit – as having an ecology of its own, roughly analogous to that of natural wildlife habitat. Nature works best when it is in balance and, like the natural environment when operating at its best, the built environment created by us humans should achieve harmony among its various parts and with the larger world upon which it depends. But, while the ecology of the natural world – at least as usually studied – concerns itself primarily with the interdependence and health of non-human species, the ecology of people habitat concerns itself also with our relationships as humans to each other, and with the health of communities that support those relationships and allow us to flourish alongside and within nature. 

I believe we humans have an opportunity and a duty to make our habitat work both for us as people and for the sustainable health of the planet writ large. Indeed, if our solutions do not work for people, they will never work for the planet.”

Photo: Flick user Payton Chung.

The Architect’s Newspaper:
“FEATURE> THE NUANCED APPROACH
Designers from coast to coast are breaking through the old distinction between grey and green infrastructure to establish strategies that apply a mix of the two.
John Gendall. Oct 1, 2013
New York was still pumping Sandy’s surge-water out of its subway system when news headlines began to trumpet how best to ride out the next big storm—“NYC Sea Barrier: Its Time Has Come” or “Saving New York by Going Green”—leaving the impression that infrastructure could be neatly categorized into opposite kinds: grey vs. green or hard vs. soft. The thread that bound everything together was the promise of a more “resilient” New York. But the menacing irony here is that these kinds of easy dualisms have a lot to do with getting us to our present state of vulnerability in the first place. When the U.S. looks like a schoolroom map—blue for water, green for land, Mississippi River as a winding line, and barrier islands stretching out along the coast—it seems perfectly reasonable to build public housing on the Rockaways, industrial parks along the Gulf Coast, and cities in the Mississippi delta. In reality, though, coastlines are not lines at all, but zones of negotiation between land and sea, barrier islands are on the move (briskly so, on geological terms), and the delta is an impossible-to-distinguish mixture of water and land and everything in between. The climate-related risks we now face don’t hew to any dualisms. Floodwaters overwhelm dykes and dunes alike. Tornados and wildfires are blindly indiscriminate. And heat waves are just that: waves that lack clear boundary in space and time. It follows, then, that the strategies used to render our communities resilient from these risks must also emerge from this kind of nuance.”
Photo: SWA GROUP’S BUFFALO BAYOU PROMENADE CREATED RECREATIONAL AREAS ALONG THE WATERWAY AND INCORPORATED FLOOD MITIGATION INFRASTRUCTURE.TOM FOX / SWA GROUP

The Architect’s Newspaper:

FEATURE> THE NUANCED APPROACH

Designers from coast to coast are breaking through the old distinction between grey and green infrastructure to establish strategies that apply a mix of the two.

John Gendall. Oct 1, 2013

New York was still pumping Sandy’s surge-water out of its subway system when news headlines began to trumpet how best to ride out the next big storm—“NYC Sea Barrier: Its Time Has Come” or “Saving New York by Going Green”—leaving the impression that infrastructure could be neatly categorized into opposite kinds: grey vs. green or hard vs. soft. The thread that bound everything together was the promise of a more “resilient” New York. But the menacing irony here is that these kinds of easy dualisms have a lot to do with getting us to our present state of vulnerability in the first place. When the U.S. looks like a schoolroom map—blue for water, green for land, Mississippi River as a winding line, and barrier islands stretching out along the coast—it seems perfectly reasonable to build public housing on the Rockaways, industrial parks along the Gulf Coast, and cities in the Mississippi delta. In reality, though, coastlines are not lines at all, but zones of negotiation between land and sea, barrier islands are on the move (briskly so, on geological terms), and the delta is an impossible-to-distinguish mixture of water and land and everything in between. The climate-related risks we now face don’t hew to any dualisms. Floodwaters overwhelm dykes and dunes alike. Tornados and wildfires are blindly indiscriminate. And heat waves are just that: waves that lack clear boundary in space and time. It follows, then, that the strategies used to render our communities resilient from these risks must also emerge from this kind of nuance.”

Photo: SWA GROUP’S BUFFALO BAYOU PROMENADE CREATED RECREATIONAL AREAS ALONG THE WATERWAY AND INCORPORATED FLOOD MITIGATION INFRASTRUCTURE.TOM FOX / SWA GROUP

The Architect’s Newspaper:

"FEATURE> URBAN REROUTE
Streetcar, trolley, and rail projects are stirring development the Midwest.

Ian Fullerton. 8.28.2013

Despite the influx of art galleries, restaurants, and luxury lofts that have popped up throughout Chicago’s Fulton Market in the past decade, the area—lined with brick mid-rises and an ever-shrinking stock of parking spaces—still clings to its slaughterhouse roots. Passing by the Wichita Packing Co. building on Elizabeth Avenue, one can clearly make out the pink silhouette of a pig painted above the doorway of a one-time boarding stable.
Located just outside of the city’s downtown Loop, Fulton Market now moves more people than livestock. Last year, the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) unveiled a sleek glass-and-steel train station at Morgan and Lake, just south of the neighborhood’s main restaurant drag—closing a gap that has until now limited public travel to the rapidly changing area. Designed by Ross Barney Architects, the stop, built on the site of a former station that closed in 1948, has at last opened up Fulton Market to the kind of foot traffic and residential appeal that emerging neighborhoods long for. In Chicago, as in cities across the Midwest, this is the promise of transportation projects: if you build it, they will come, and they will most likely shop.”
Photo: Ross Barney Architects
"FEATURE> URBAN REROUTE
Streetcar, trolley, and rail projects are stirring development the Midwest.
Ian Fullerton. 8.28.2013

Despite the influx of art galleries, restaurants, and luxury lofts that have popped up throughout Chicago’s Fulton Market in the past decade, the area—lined with brick mid-rises and an ever-shrinking stock of parking spaces—still clings to its slaughterhouse roots. Passing by the Wichita Packing Co. building on Elizabeth Avenue, one can clearly make out the pink silhouette of a pig painted above the doorway of a one-time boarding stable.

Located just outside of the city’s downtown Loop, Fulton Market now moves more people than livestock. Last year, the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) unveiled a sleek glass-and-steel train station at Morgan and Lake, just south of the neighborhood’s main restaurant drag—closing a gap that has until now limited public travel to the rapidly changing area. Designed by Ross Barney Architects, the stop, built on the site of a former station that closed in 1948, has at last opened up Fulton Market to the kind of foot traffic and residential appeal that emerging neighborhoods long for. In Chicago, as in cities across the Midwest, this is the promise of transportation projects: if you build it, they will come, and they will most likely shop.”

Photo: Ross Barney Architects

The Architect’s Newspaper:
“DON’T CALL IT A HIGH LINE
B.Tyler Sylvestro
Planning and design team for QueensWay elevated park announced.
QueensWay, the hotly debated and potentially transformative linear park proposal replacing abandoned railroad tracks from Rego Park to Ozone Park in Queens, now has a design and planning team. WXY architecture + urban design and dlandstudio, both New York-based firms, were on the receiving end of a phone call from the Trust for Public Land (TPL) who organized the discreet RFP. The team was selected from a pool of 29 proposals.
On a rainy day in March, a privately invited group of architects and landscape architects were chauffeured (by bus) to a few sections of the abandoned line in Queens. Along the QueensWay route, TPL’s guests viewed the blighted railroad as it dips and soars from moment to moment, carving through a ravine in Forest Hills. WXY and dlandstudio saw opportunity.
The proposal calls for the connection of ecologies to be the guiding framework. “QueensWay with sensitive design can become a critical artery of green open space for a diverse, vibrant community, offering opportunities for recreation, education, community gathering, and ecological productivity to our great city,” said dlandstudio’s Susannah Drake in a statement. Claire Weisz, principal at WXY agreed, “This study is an important next step in making the vision of reclaiming the QueensWay as a green connector and cultural corridor a reality.”
Image: RENDERING SHOWING ONE CONCEPT FOR THE QUEENSWAY. COURTESY WXY

The Architect’s Newspaper:

DON’T CALL IT A HIGH LINE

B.Tyler Sylvestro

Planning and design team for QueensWay elevated park announced.

QueensWay, the hotly debated and potentially transformative linear park proposal replacing abandoned railroad tracks from Rego Park to Ozone Park in Queens, now has a design and planning team. WXY architecture + urban design and dlandstudio, both New York-based firms, were on the receiving end of a phone call from the Trust for Public Land (TPL) who organized the discreet RFP. The team was selected from a pool of 29 proposals.

On a rainy day in March, a privately invited group of architects and landscape architects were chauffeured (by bus) to a few sections of the abandoned line in Queens. Along the QueensWay route, TPL’s guests viewed the blighted railroad as it dips and soars from moment to moment, carving through a ravine in Forest Hills. WXY and dlandstudio saw opportunity.

The proposal calls for the connection of ecologies to be the guiding framework. “QueensWay with sensitive design can become a critical artery of green open space for a diverse, vibrant community, offering opportunities for recreation, education, community gathering, and ecological productivity to our great city,” said dlandstudio’s Susannah Drake in a statement. Claire Weisz, principal at WXY agreed, “This study is an important next step in making the vision of reclaiming the QueensWay as a green connector and cultural corridor a reality.”

Image: RENDERING SHOWING ONE CONCEPT FOR THE QUEENSWAY. COURTESY WXY

The Architect’s Newspaper:
“FEATURE> THE BUFFALO BOOM
After decades of stagnation and decline, this Rust Belt city is finally on the upswing.
Jenna McKnight. Aug 6, 2013
The Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane, designed by H.H. Richardson with a landscape by Frederick Law Olmsted, has been a mighty but ghostly presence since it was largely abandoned in the 1970s. Preservationists have long fought to save the monolithic complex that stretches across roughly 90 acres. Now, their efforts are paying off, with work under way to transform a portion of the late-19 -century structure into a boutique hotel, conference venue, and an architecture center.
“We’ve been lucky,” said architect Barbara Campagna, while giving a hard-hat tour of the facility on a steamy summer afternoon. “It’s such a sound building—it’s still in decent shape.”
Campagna sits on the board of the Richardson Center Corporation, which is tasked with overseeing the site’s redevelopment. While the group has engaged a lengthy roster of consultants over the years, the current design team comprises Flynn Battaglia Architects, Deborah Berke Partners, and Goody Clancy. Public and private money is funding the estimated $56 million project.”
Photo: BUFFALO CANALSIDE BY PERKINS EASTMAN.
COURTESY PERKINS EASTMAN

The Architect’s Newspaper:

FEATURE> THE BUFFALO BOOM

After decades of stagnation and decline, this Rust Belt city is finally on the upswing.

Jenna McKnight. Aug 6, 2013

The Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane, designed by H.H. Richardson with a landscape by Frederick Law Olmsted, has been a mighty but ghostly presence since it was largely abandoned in the 1970s. Preservationists have long fought to save the monolithic complex that stretches across roughly 90 acres. Now, their efforts are paying off, with work under way to transform a portion of the late-19 -century structure into a boutique hotel, conference venue, and an architecture center.

“We’ve been lucky,” said architect Barbara Campagna, while giving a hard-hat tour of the facility on a steamy summer afternoon. “It’s such a sound building—it’s still in decent shape.”

Campagna sits on the board of the Richardson Center Corporation, which is tasked with overseeing the site’s redevelopment. While the group has engaged a lengthy roster of consultants over the years, the current design team comprises Flynn Battaglia Architects, Deborah Berke Partners, and Goody Clancy. Public and private money is funding the estimated $56 million project.”

Photo: BUFFALO CANALSIDE BY PERKINS EASTMAN.

COURTESY PERKINS EASTMAN
 SF Examiner:
"S.F.’s parklets program learns from failure, moves ahead
Andrea Koskey. Aug 4, 2012
On Haight Street, two new parking spaces where a parklet was recently removed highlight the growing pains of a popular open-space program and what The City can learn from the failure.
In July, a parklet outside of Martin Macks bar in the Upper Haight was the first to be removed after nearly a year of controversy, and Planning Department officials running the program have learned from this incident and others that have cropped up around The City.
San Francisco pioneered parklets, starting in 2009 when then-Mayor Gavin Newsom asked the Department of Public Works, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and the Planning Department to come up with a “temporary urbanism program.” The concept the agencies came up with allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into open spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.”
Photo: Andrea Koskey

 SF Examiner:

"S.F.’s parklets program learns from failure, moves ahead

Andrea Koskey. Aug 4, 2012

On Haight Street, two new parking spaces where a parklet was recently removed highlight the growing pains of a popular open-space program and what The City can learn from the failure.

In July, a parklet outside of Martin Macks bar in the Upper Haight was the first to be removed after nearly a year of controversy, and Planning Department officials running the program have learned from this incident and others that have cropped up around The City.

San Francisco pioneered parklets, starting in 2009 when then-Mayor Gavin Newsom asked the Department of Public Works, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and the Planning Department to come up with a “temporary urbanism program.” The concept the agencies came up with allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into open spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.”

Photo: Andrea Koskey

Architect’s Newspaper
"Bloomberg unfurls New York City flood protection plan.
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg unveiled a comprehensive plan this month to address the looming hazards of climate change to New York City. The ambitious 438-page report, aptly titled “A Stronger, More Resilient New York,” calls for $19.5 billion in funding to implement a program of roughly 250 recommendations to protect the city’s buildings, infrastructure, and public realm from severe storms and rising sea levels. The initiatives outlined in the plan are often site specific and run the gamut from local storm surge barriers and beach nourishment strategies to zoning changes and new design solutions for damaged homes.
A few months after Hurricane Sandy ravaged the east coast, Mayor Bloomberg assembled a task force, the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency, to study the impact of the storm and create a thorough resiliency plan to tackle the challenges posed by changing weather patterns and to provide new resources, strategies, and support in the ongoing recovery efforts.
“It is a full spectrum response,” said Illya Azaroff, principal at +LAB and co-chair of design for risk and reconstruction at AIA New York, who attended a private technical review of the report. “As Seth Pinsky said, ‘there is no silver bullet’ to address all conditions including zoning, building code, and actual physical building. The report is really broken down into multiple layers of response that are needed to have multiple layers of resiliency.”
The report first takes a sweeping look at climate change by offering a detailed account of Sandy’s impact on the city. It then assesses the risks that lie ahead with the likelihood of more extreme storm surges and imminent topographical changes to the city’s 520-mile coastline within the next 50 years.”
Image: THE REPORT CALLS FOR NEW WETLANDS TO HELP ABSORB WATER. COURTESY NEW YORK PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Architect’s Newspaper

"Bloomberg unfurls New York City flood protection plan.

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg unveiled a comprehensive plan this month to address the looming hazards of climate change to New York City. The ambitious 438-page report, aptly titled “A Stronger, More Resilient New York,” calls for $19.5 billion in funding to implement a program of roughly 250 recommendations to protect the city’s buildings, infrastructure, and public realm from severe storms and rising sea levels. The initiatives outlined in the plan are often site specific and run the gamut from local storm surge barriers and beach nourishment strategies to zoning changes and new design solutions for damaged homes.

A few months after Hurricane Sandy ravaged the east coast, Mayor Bloomberg assembled a task force, the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency, to study the impact of the storm and create a thorough resiliency plan to tackle the challenges posed by changing weather patterns and to provide new resources, strategies, and support in the ongoing recovery efforts.

“It is a full spectrum response,” said Illya Azaroff, principal at +LAB and co-chair of design for risk and reconstruction at AIA New York, who attended a private technical review of the report. “As Seth Pinsky said, ‘there is no silver bullet’ to address all conditions including zoning, building code, and actual physical building. The report is really broken down into multiple layers of response that are needed to have multiple layers of resiliency.”

The report first takes a sweeping look at climate change by offering a detailed account of Sandy’s impact on the city. It then assesses the risks that lie ahead with the likelihood of more extreme storm surges and imminent topographical changes to the city’s 520-mile coastline within the next 50 years.”

Image: THE REPORT CALLS FOR NEW WETLANDS TO HELP ABSORB WATER. COURTESY NEW YORK PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Los Angeles Downtown News:
"Is Downtown’s Low-Rise Building Spree Hurting the Community?
Ryan Vaillancourt. July 15, 2013
DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - New housing projects are under construction all across Downtown Los Angeles. From Chinatown, where the 280-unit Jia Apartments are being built, to Eighth Street and Grand Avenue, where San Francisco’s Carmel Partners are erecting a 700-unit complex, hundreds of millions of dollars are being invested.
This activity is giving Downtown boosters reason to cheer: More housing brings more restaurants, bars, entertainment spots and retail.
However, some view the residential surge with caution. Certain architects, urban planners and developers worry that parking lot sites that could accommodate high-rises instead are being filled by five- to seven-story, wood-framed apartment complexes encased in plaster. 
Gone is a chance to create residential density in the part of the city where it isn’t largely opposed by community stakeholders, and where it makes the most urban planning sense — alongside mass transit and jobs. Instead, Downtown is getting the type of buildings that predominate in suburban areas. 
'It seems odd that as the city grows, the quality of Downtown stone construction is being replaced by sticks and plaster,” said Eric Owen Moss, director of the Southern California Institute of Architecture. “A bigger scale and larger conception is being replaced by a smaller scale and no conception, other than an easy to replicate economic model.'
The concern is shared by City Planning Director Michael LoGrande. While he acknowledges that projects like the Jia Apartments and the 280-unit Ava Little Tokyo are adding much-needed supply to a market that currently has an occupancy rate near 95%, he worries that future Angelenos will look back at today’s growth surge and lament that the developers didn’t aim higher. “
Photo: Holland Partners’ 1111 Wilshire, which opened this year, was originally entitled as a high-rise. It is one of several sites where some say the city should be encouraging more density. Gary Leonard

 

Los Angeles Downtown News:

"Is Downtown’s Low-Rise Building Spree Hurting the Community?

Ryan Vaillancourt. July 15, 2013

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - New housing projects are under construction all across Downtown Los Angeles. From Chinatown, where the 280-unit Jia Apartments are being built, to Eighth Street and Grand Avenue, where San Francisco’s Carmel Partners are erecting a 700-unit complex, hundreds of millions of dollars are being invested.

This activity is giving Downtown boosters reason to cheer: More housing brings more restaurants, bars, entertainment spots and retail.

However, some view the residential surge with caution. Certain architects, urban planners and developers worry that parking lot sites that could accommodate high-rises instead are being filled by five- to seven-story, wood-framed apartment complexes encased in plaster. 

Gone is a chance to create residential density in the part of the city where it isn’t largely opposed by community stakeholders, and where it makes the most urban planning sense — alongside mass transit and jobs. Instead, Downtown is getting the type of buildings that predominate in suburban areas. 

'It seems odd that as the city grows, the quality of Downtown stone construction is being replaced by sticks and plaster,” said Eric Owen Moss, director of the Southern California Institute of Architecture. “A bigger scale and larger conception is being replaced by a smaller scale and no conception, other than an easy to replicate economic model.'

The concern is shared by City Planning Director Michael LoGrande. While he acknowledges that projects like the Jia Apartments and the 280-unit Ava Little Tokyo are adding much-needed supply to a market that currently has an occupancy rate near 95%, he worries that future Angelenos will look back at today’s growth surge and lament that the developers didn’t aim higher. “

Photo: Holland Partners’ 1111 Wilshire, which opened this year, was originally entitled as a high-rise. It is one of several sites where some say the city should be encouraging more density. Gary Leonard

 

    The Architect’s Newspaper
“FEATURE> EMERGENT MASTER PLANNING
Across the country, architects are taking a leading role in laying out the future of cities.
John Gendall. July 10, 2013
For as much as the rejuvenation of American cities during the past two decades has been accomplished by grassroots, D.I.Y. movements, the 21st Century is seeing a return of the urban master plan. John Gendall goes on a coast-to-coast tour of some of the country’s biggest inner-city development projects to find out how today’s master planners are finding ways to reconcile Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs.
If you’re a reader of design magazines, you may be forgiven for thinking that 21st century urbanism is a product of popsicle stands and micro-gardens. In part, fueled by a distaste for anything that had a hand in the 2008 economic collapse (main characters: bankers, big government, and needlessly risky developers), urban theory took a turn to the grass-roots, self-starting stories that sprang up in the fault lines of the Clinton/Bush-era real estate bonanza. The American city, though, is facing a critical turning point, having to reckon with changing economic engines, the public health realities of environmental abuse, and a cultural reevaluation of the suburbs. While I like artisanal popsicles as much as the next person (truth be told, I like them more), with a glut of these so-called D.I.Y. Urbanism projects pinballing through blogs and magazines, it seems right to ask ‘where has the master plan gone?’”
Image: SOM AND SASAKI ARE TRANSFORMING A 600-ACRE FORMER U.S. STEEL MILL ON CHICAGO’S SOUTH SIDE INTO A MIXED-USE DISTRICT WITH PARKS, A MARINA, AND SMALL BLOCK SIZES.
COURTESY SOM

    The Architect’s Newspaper

    FEATURE> EMERGENT MASTER PLANNING

    Across the country, architects are taking a leading role in laying out the future of cities.

    John Gendall. July 10, 2013

    For as much as the rejuvenation of American cities during the past two decades has been accomplished by grassroots, D.I.Y. movements, the 21st Century is seeing a return of the urban master plan. John Gendall goes on a coast-to-coast tour of some of the country’s biggest inner-city development projects to find out how today’s master planners are finding ways to reconcile Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs.

    If you’re a reader of design magazines, you may be forgiven for thinking that 21st century urbanism is a product of popsicle stands and micro-gardens. In part, fueled by a distaste for anything that had a hand in the 2008 economic collapse (main characters: bankers, big government, and needlessly risky developers), urban theory took a turn to the grass-roots, self-starting stories that sprang up in the fault lines of the Clinton/Bush-era real estate bonanza. The American city, though, is facing a critical turning point, having to reckon with changing economic engines, the public health realities of environmental abuse, and a cultural reevaluation of the suburbs. While I like artisanal popsicles as much as the next person (truth be told, I like them more), with a glut of these so-called D.I.Y. Urbanism projects pinballing through blogs and magazines, it seems right to ask ‘where has the master plan gone?’”

    Image: SOM AND SASAKI ARE TRANSFORMING A 600-ACRE FORMER U.S. STEEL MILL ON CHICAGO’S SOUTH SIDE INTO A MIXED-USE DISTRICT WITH PARKS, A MARINA, AND SMALL BLOCK SIZES.

    COURTESY SOM
    The Architects Newspaper:
RIVER OF INDUSTRY
Nicole Anderson.
Philadelphia adopts plan to revive activity on the Schuylkill River.
A plan to revive 3,700 acres of Philadelphia’s Lower Schuylkill River—an industrial area that has long been home to oil refineries—is now underway. On May 21, the Philadelphia Planning Commission adopted the Lower Schuylkill Master Plan, which seeks to turn the area into a thriving manufacturing hub.
“It took us 18 months to pull it together,” said Thomas Dalfo, senior vice president of real estate services for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC). “The concept is to take this industrial district, which in a larger respect under performs compared to what it has done historically, and bring it up to the standards of the city’s other districts. We want to get the vision out into the market and let [potential businesses] know where the city’s investment is going.”
Photo: PIDC

    The Architects Newspaper:

    RIVER OF INDUSTRY

    Nicole Anderson.

    Philadelphia adopts plan to revive activity on the Schuylkill River.

    A plan to revive 3,700 acres of Philadelphia’s Lower Schuylkill River—an industrial area that has long been home to oil refineries—is now underway. On May 21, the Philadelphia Planning Commission adopted the Lower Schuylkill Master Plan, which seeks to turn the area into a thriving manufacturing hub.

    “It took us 18 months to pull it together,” said Thomas Dalfo, senior vice president of real estate services for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC). “The concept is to take this industrial district, which in a larger respect under performs compared to what it has done historically, and bring it up to the standards of the city’s other districts. We want to get the vision out into the market and let [potential businesses] know where the city’s investment is going.”

    Photo: PIDC

    Architectural + Urban Research

    Mass Urban is a multidisciplinary design-research initiative concerned with contemporary cities and urbanism. Mass Urban was co-founded in April 2011 by David Lee and Cliff Lau.

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