Posts tagged "Urban Forests"
“The maple plan: Bringing the forest to the city
By Diana Nelson Jones / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. June 30, 2012
As the bus lumbered through the city on a day that cried for shade, Arthur “Butch” Blazer fanned the barely conditioned air with his black Western hat. At every turn, trees swept past the windows — the mature canopy in Allegheny Cemetery, the new line of saplings in the median on Penn Avenue in East Liberty — until the bus stopped in North Point Breeze at Tree Pittsburgh’s seedling nursery.
Mr. Blazer, the U.S. Agriculture Department’s deputy under secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment, joined Tree Pittsburgh’s Thursday afternoon tour, after which it presented its urban forest master plan at an evening reception at Bar Marco in the Strip.
The $275,000 plan resulted from two years of data collection, analysis, consultations and benchmarking, and the USDA helped pay for it.
"The master planning process here is extremely important because it connects to the president’s Great Outdoors Initiative," Mr. Blazer said. "When people think ‘great outdoors,’ they think of places like Yosemite. They need to start thinking about places like Pittsburgh, too. Eighty percent of our country’s population is in urban areas, and we know the importance trees have on the psyches of humans."
The master plan reports the city has more than 2.5 million trees that sequester 13,900 tons of carbon dioxide a year, saved residents $3 million in energy bills last year and remove 519 tons of pollution at a savings of $3.6 million a year. Street trees alone diverted 41.8 million gallons of stormwater last year.
Research for the master plan used new Forest Service technology that takes data and spits out environmental impact.
Danielle Crumrine, executive director of Tree Pittsburgh, said the plan will spur tree advocates to increase the size of the canopy, improve its condition, diversify its species and plant in neighborhoods that have been neglected. Although 42 percent of the city is covered in trees, most of the canopy is in parks and more affluent neighborhoods.
At the nursery, high school students from Homewood’s Junior Green Corps, an Operation Better Block job training program, were harvesting seeds and planting under a tent at the back of the nursery, which was established two years ago in part with a grant from The Sprout Fund.
Kahlil Morris, a supervisor of the Green Corps, said all 21 participants are training to be Tree Tenders, a volunteer program run by Tree Pittsburgh to teach residents about the proper care and pruning of trees.
"We want to keep this partnership," he said. "It’s a cool program and it’s close" to Homewood."
"I’m excited to see the work these young people are doing and the things they are learning," Mr. Blazer said. "As you implement your plan and improve upon your urban forest, we on the federal level can work with the city and local organizations to create more opportunities for young people."
Via: Pittsburgh Gazette
Photo: Michael Henninger/Post-Gazette
Deputy Under Secretary Butch Blazer of the U.S. Agriculture Department, center, speaks with, from left, Matt Erb of Tree Pittsburgh, Christine Ticehurst of TreeVitalize, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and Danielle Crumrine of Tree Pittsburgh during stops at Tree Pittsburgh’s nursery on Simonton Street in Homewood during a tour of Pittsburgh on Thursday.

The maple plan: Bringing the forest to the city

By Diana Nelson Jones / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. June 30, 2012

As the bus lumbered through the city on a day that cried for shade, Arthur “Butch” Blazer fanned the barely conditioned air with his black Western hat. At every turn, trees swept past the windows — the mature canopy in Allegheny Cemetery, the new line of saplings in the median on Penn Avenue in East Liberty — until the bus stopped in North Point Breeze at Tree Pittsburgh’s seedling nursery.

Mr. Blazer, the U.S. Agriculture Department’s deputy under secretary of agriculture for natural resources and environment, joined Tree Pittsburgh’s Thursday afternoon tour, after which it presented its urban forest master plan at an evening reception at Bar Marco in the Strip.

The $275,000 plan resulted from two years of data collection, analysis, consultations and benchmarking, and the USDA helped pay for it.

"The master planning process here is extremely important because it connects to the president’s Great Outdoors Initiative," Mr. Blazer said. "When people think ‘great outdoors,’ they think of places like Yosemite. They need to start thinking about places like Pittsburgh, too. Eighty percent of our country’s population is in urban areas, and we know the importance trees have on the psyches of humans."

The master plan reports the city has more than 2.5 million trees that sequester 13,900 tons of carbon dioxide a year, saved residents $3 million in energy bills last year and remove 519 tons of pollution at a savings of $3.6 million a year. Street trees alone diverted 41.8 million gallons of stormwater last year.

Research for the master plan used new Forest Service technology that takes data and spits out environmental impact.

Danielle Crumrine, executive director of Tree Pittsburgh, said the plan will spur tree advocates to increase the size of the canopy, improve its condition, diversify its species and plant in neighborhoods that have been neglected. Although 42 percent of the city is covered in trees, most of the canopy is in parks and more affluent neighborhoods.

At the nursery, high school students from Homewood’s Junior Green Corps, an Operation Better Block job training program, were harvesting seeds and planting under a tent at the back of the nursery, which was established two years ago in part with a grant from The Sprout Fund.

Kahlil Morris, a supervisor of the Green Corps, said all 21 participants are training to be Tree Tenders, a volunteer program run by Tree Pittsburgh to teach residents about the proper care and pruning of trees.

"We want to keep this partnership," he said. "It’s a cool program and it’s close" to Homewood."

"I’m excited to see the work these young people are doing and the things they are learning," Mr. Blazer said. "As you implement your plan and improve upon your urban forest, we on the federal level can work with the city and local organizations to create more opportunities for young people."

Via: Pittsburgh Gazette

Photo: Michael Henninger/Post-Gazette

Deputy Under Secretary Butch Blazer of the U.S. Agriculture Department, center, speaks with, from left, Matt Erb of Tree Pittsburgh, Christine Ticehurst of TreeVitalize, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl and Danielle Crumrine of Tree Pittsburgh during stops at Tree Pittsburgh’s nursery on Simonton Street in Homewood during a tour of Pittsburgh on Thursday.

Urban Forests = Cleaner, Cooler Air

Key Facts:

Poor air quality has led to an explosion of asthma cases and other health problems among vulnerable populations including children, the elderly, and low-income residents. Each year bad air causes two million deaths worldwide. Also, in the U.S., there have been 8,000 premature deaths from excessive heat over the past 25 years. Urban heat islands, which are caused, in part, by sunlight being absorbed by paved surfaces and roofs, lead to higher surface temperatures, up to 90 degrees. Atmospheric air temperatures are also higher: in the day by up to 6 degrees, and at night, by up to 22 degrees. Vulnerable populations also face greater risks of heat exhaustion. (Source: World Health Organization (WHO) and Heat Island Impacts, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) )

Increasing the tree canopy in cities is one way to fight both poor air quality and urban heat islands. Research shows significant short-term improvements in air quality in urban areas with 100 percent tree cover. There, trees can reduce hourly ozone by up to 15 percent, sulfur dioxide by 14 percent, and particulate matter by 13 percent. U.S. trees remove some 784,000 tons of pollution annually, providing $3.8 billion in value.”

Via: American Society of Landscape Architects

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