Posts tagged "Cinncinati"
The Atlantic Cities: 
"Why Detroit’s Collapse Was So Much Worse Than Other Hard-Hit Cities
Eric Jaffe. Jan 29, 2014
The best CityRead of this month may be the New Yorker profile of L. Brooks Patterson, kingpin of suburban Detroit (paywall). Patterson wears a number of hats — chief executive of Oakland County, sprawl lover, political loud mouth, unabashed Detroit basher — and is a controversial personality, to put it kindly. He has faced allegations of racism in the past, and reading Williams’s profile it’s not hard to see why:

When I asked him how Detroit might fix its financial problems, he said, “I made a prediction a long time ago, and it’s come to pass. I said, ‘What we’re gonna do is turn Detroit into an Indian reservation, where we herd all the Indians into the city, build a fence around it, and then throw in the blankets and corn.’”

Whatever you think of Patterson as a person, he’s been a successful executive for Oakland County by fiscal standards. His current plan is to shift his suburban county from a manufacturing-based job center to a knowledge-based one. If he would cooperate with Detroit, there might be a good partnership here, because the city is trying to do the same thing. As Richard Florida has argued, the future of Detroit’s economic growth may hinge on “its creative and knowledge industries.”
Photo: Reuters

The Atlantic Cities: 

"Why Detroit’s Collapse Was So Much Worse Than Other Hard-Hit Cities

Eric Jaffe. Jan 29, 2014

The best CityRead of this month may be the New Yorker profile of L. Brooks Patterson, kingpin of suburban Detroit (paywall). Patterson wears a number of hats — chief executive of Oakland County, sprawl lover, political loud mouth, unabashed Detroit basher — and is a controversial personality, to put it kindly. He has faced allegations of racism in the past, and reading Williams’s profile it’s not hard to see why:

When I asked him how Detroit might fix its financial problems, he said, “I made a prediction a long time ago, and it’s come to pass. I said, ‘What we’re gonna do is turn Detroit into an Indian reservation, where we herd all the Indians into the city, build a fence around it, and then throw in the blankets and corn.’”

Whatever you think of Patterson as a person, he’s been a successful executive for Oakland County by fiscal standards. His current plan is to shift his suburban county from a manufacturing-based job center to a knowledge-based one. If he would cooperate with Detroit, there might be a good partnership here, because the city is trying to do the same thing. As Richard Florida has argued, the future of Detroit’s economic growth may hinge on “its creative and knowledge industries.”

Photo: Reuters

“The Next Major Real Estate Cycle: Walkable Urbanism?

Not too long ago in Washington, D.C. – and still today in plenty of other cities – “walkable urbanism” was a niche real estate market. Developers weren’t all that interested in mixed-use, compact projects, of the kind where carless urbanites might live, work and grocery shop in strolling distance. And people didn’t seem to want to live in them anyway. But things have been changing in the capital. Now, argues real estate developer and George Washington University professor Christopher Leinberger, walkable urbanism is becoming the real estate market.
Washington’s evolution hints at what will happen in this next real estate cycle in cities everywhere, Leinberger concludes in new research to be presented at a conference on the topicnext week. His findings build on an earlier study conducted at the Brookings Institution. In all, the Washington region now leads the nation with 43 distinct neighborhoods Leinberger has identified as “regionally significant walkable urban places” (in other words, those walkable places that also help power the metro economy as jobs centers). A mere .9 percent of the land in the entire Washington region is currently devoted to such places. But 34 percent of the region’s jobs are located there. And these places, Leinberger argues, represent the future of cities everywhere – for the coming wave of development in residential construction, in office space, in entertainment and in retail.
"Less than 10 percent of the entire metropolitan land mass is where development wants to go over the next generation,” Leinberger says. “We don’t need to add another square foot – or, in the case of sprawl, another square mile – of land to the metropolitan area. We’ve already urbanized as much as we need to.”
This is a pretty radical pronouncement: if Washington continues to grow over the next generation, without continuing its voracious spread into the Virginia and Maryland countryside, that development pattern would defy decades of history since World War II. And just because the region’s existing urbanized footprint can handle all of this new development (Washington is a fraction as dense, for instance, as low-rise Paris), that doesn’t guarantee that policymakers and real estate developers will be able to switch gears as fast as this demand is shifting.
Leinberger, however, points to real estate data dating back to the early 1990s that suggests this transition is already well underway. During the 1990s real estate cycle (from 1992 to 2000), 38 percent of the new office space built in the Washington area was constructed in these walkable places. In the next cycle, from 2000 to the beginning of the recession in 2008, that number went up to 49 percent. Since 2009 – the onset of this latest real estate round – that figure has gone up to 59 percent. New rental apartments have similarly trended in this direction.”
Via: The Atlantic Cities
Photo: Flickr/M.V. Jantzen

The Next Major Real Estate Cycle: Walkable Urbanism?

Not too long ago in Washington, D.C. – and still today in plenty of other cities – “walkable urbanism” was a niche real estate market. Developers weren’t all that interested in mixed-use, compact projects, of the kind where carless urbanites might live, work and grocery shop in strolling distance. And people didn’t seem to want to live in them anyway. But things have been changing in the capital. Now, argues real estate developer and George Washington University professor Christopher Leinberger, walkable urbanism is becoming the real estate market.

Washington’s evolution hints at what will happen in this next real estate cycle in cities everywhere, Leinberger concludes in new research to be presented at a conference on the topicnext week. His findings build on an earlier study conducted at the Brookings Institution. In all, the Washington region now leads the nation with 43 distinct neighborhoods Leinberger has identified as “regionally significant walkable urban places” (in other words, those walkable places that also help power the metro economy as jobs centers). A mere .9 percent of the land in the entire Washington region is currently devoted to such places. But 34 percent of the region’s jobs are located there. And these places, Leinberger argues, represent the future of cities everywhere – for the coming wave of development in residential construction, in office space, in entertainment and in retail.

"Less than 10 percent of the entire metropolitan land mass is where development wants to go over the next generation,” Leinberger says. “We don’t need to add another square foot – or, in the case of sprawl, another square mile – of land to the metropolitan area. We’ve already urbanized as much as we need to.”

This is a pretty radical pronouncement: if Washington continues to grow over the next generation, without continuing its voracious spread into the Virginia and Maryland countryside, that development pattern would defy decades of history since World War II. And just because the region’s existing urbanized footprint can handle all of this new development (Washington is a fraction as dense, for instance, as low-rise Paris), that doesn’t guarantee that policymakers and real estate developers will be able to switch gears as fast as this demand is shifting.

Leinberger, however, points to real estate data dating back to the early 1990s that suggests this transition is already well underway. During the 1990s real estate cycle (from 1992 to 2000), 38 percent of the new office space built in the Washington area was constructed in these walkable places. In the next cycle, from 2000 to the beginning of the recession in 2008, that number went up to 49 percent. Since 2009 – the onset of this latest real estate round – that figure has gone up to 59 percent. New rental apartments have similarly trended in this direction.”

Via: The Atlantic Cities

Photo: Flickr/M.V. Jantzen

"RAILVOLUTION! Cincinnati plans for more streetcars while constructing its first route.
Steven Vance. June 1, 2012
In his seventh State of the City address on April 10, Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory talked about the streetcar the city had started building in February, introducing the subject with, “And you all know that I could not let you out of here tonight without talking about the streetcar.” Mallory linked the streetcar creation to a strategy to help the city thrive. He also laid out a vision for a much larger rail transit system.
Building the first line took persistence. Hamilton County voters rejected a proposed plan for improved and expanded transit in 2002. Then ballots in 2009 and 2011 tried to block the city from building streetcars. Both failed.
Part of the city’s marketing message for the rail network is that the streetcar system will attract new businesses. An economic development study the city commissioned found that property values would be greater and emissions and pollution reduced. The study also found savings in congestion and reductions in crashes when people choose to take a streetcar over their personal automobiles.

The city government is leading the planning and construction of the streetcar system, and Metro, the local transit agency, will operate it. The route will reach from downtown to Over-The-Rhine Historic District, making 18 stops in its roundtrip journey. The construction costs are estimated to be $99.5 million plus utility relocation. A fare price hasn’t been determined.

The April speech brought more specifics: Mallory announced that the city selected CAF USA to design and manufacture the trains and showed renderings of the proposed design. Attractive trains aren’t the only outcome of a good transit system. Mobility and connections are key, so Mallory described a second route in Uptown, for which the city is seeking $1.2 million in federal New Starts funds for a study.

The city’s vision doesn’t end with light rail. Mallory mentioned using light rail alongside two highways and commuter rail (faster trains covering longer distances) for other corridors. These efforts will require regional cooperation, said Meg Olberding, spokesperson in the city manager’s office. “The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments has long-range planning tools and would pull together our partners, including Hamilton County, Metro, and the state and federal Departments of Transportation.”
Though Ohio Governor John Kasich refused federal funds to plan for and construct high-speed rail lines in the state, Mallory will push forward: “I do not believe that we should give up on the idea of high-speed rail in this state.”
Via: The Architect’s Newspaper
Image: City of Cinncinati

"RAILVOLUTION! Cincinnati plans for more streetcars while constructing its first route.

Steven Vance. June 1, 2012

In his seventh State of the City address on April 10, Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory talked about the streetcar the city had started building in February, introducing the subject with, “And you all know that I could not let you out of here tonight without talking about the streetcar.” Mallory linked the streetcar creation to a strategy to help the city thrive. He also laid out a vision for a much larger rail transit system.

Building the first line took persistence. Hamilton County voters rejected a proposed plan for improved and expanded transit in 2002. Then ballots in 2009 and 2011 tried to block the city from building streetcars. Both failed.

Part of the city’s marketing message for the rail network is that the streetcar system will attract new businesses. An economic development study the city commissioned found that property values would be greater and emissions and pollution reduced. The study also found savings in congestion and reductions in crashes when people choose to take a streetcar over their personal automobiles.

The city government is leading the planning and construction of the streetcar system, and Metro, the local transit agency, will operate it. The route will reach from downtown to Over-The-Rhine Historic District, making 18 stops in its roundtrip journey. The construction costs are estimated to be $99.5 million plus utility relocation. A fare price hasn’t been determined.

The April speech brought more specifics: Mallory announced that the city selected CAF USA to design and manufacture the trains and showed renderings of the proposed design. Attractive trains aren’t the only outcome of a good transit system. Mobility and connections are key, so Mallory described a second route in Uptown, for which the city is seeking $1.2 million in federal New Starts funds for a study.

The city’s vision doesn’t end with light rail. Mallory mentioned using light rail alongside two highways and commuter rail (faster trains covering longer distances) for other corridors. These efforts will require regional cooperation, said Meg Olberding, spokesperson in the city manager’s office. “The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments has long-range planning tools and would pull together our partners, including Hamilton County, Metro, and the state and federal Departments of Transportation.”

Though Ohio Governor John Kasich refused federal funds to plan for and construct high-speed rail lines in the state, Mallory will push forward: “I do not believe that we should give up on the idea of high-speed rail in this state.”

Via: The Architect’s Newspaper

Image: City of Cinncinati

Architectural + Urban Research

Mass Urban is a multidisciplinary design-research initiative concerned with contemporary cities and urbanism. Mass Urban was co-founded in April 2011 by David Lee and Cliff Lau.

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