“The Architect’s Newspaper:
SANDY WHO? 
New developments prevail on Brooklyn’s waterfront in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
Nicole Anderson. Dec 13, 2012
There’s no stopping waterfront development, not even by the might of Hurricane Sandy. A month after the storm swept through New York City flooding basements and shutting down power, Brooklyn residents—who live near the water—are still dealing with its aftermath. But even as the city remains locked in recovery mode, developers are forging ahead with new projects on the waterfront, undeterred by the recent damage and the chance that another such storm, and possibly of greater magnitude, could likely hit the East Coast again.
Several new developments are slated for construction in areas damaged by the storm such as Gowanus, Red Hook, and DUMBO. While rising sea levels and climate change could pose a greater risk to waterfront properties in the future, developers have no intention on walking away from these projects. Instead, they say they’re taking into account the impact of the storm and re-thinking certain elements of their plans.
This, however, has some community members and government officials worried. Councilmember Brad Lander has been urging the developer Lightstone Group to withdraw its plans to build a 700-unit complex along the Gowanus Canal.  In a letter sent to David Lichtenstein, the CEO of Lightstone, the councilman wrote: “I believe it would be a serious mistake for you to proceed as though nothing had happened, without reconsidering or altering your plans, and putting over 1,000 new residents in harm’s way the next time an event of this magnitude occurs.”
Photo: LIGHTSTONE GROUP’S MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ALONG THE GOWANUS CANAL.
COURTESY LIGHTSTONE GROUP

The Architect’s Newspaper:

SANDY WHO? 

New developments prevail on Brooklyn’s waterfront in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

Nicole Anderson. Dec 13, 2012

There’s no stopping waterfront development, not even by the might of Hurricane Sandy. A month after the storm swept through New York City flooding basements and shutting down power, Brooklyn residents—who live near the water—are still dealing with its aftermath. But even as the city remains locked in recovery mode, developers are forging ahead with new projects on the waterfront, undeterred by the recent damage and the chance that another such storm, and possibly of greater magnitude, could likely hit the East Coast again.

Several new developments are slated for construction in areas damaged by the storm such as Gowanus, Red Hook, and DUMBO. While rising sea levels and climate change could pose a greater risk to waterfront properties in the future, developers have no intention on walking away from these projects. Instead, they say they’re taking into account the impact of the storm and re-thinking certain elements of their plans.

This, however, has some community members and government officials worried. Councilmember Brad Lander has been urging the developer Lightstone Group to withdraw its plans to build a 700-unit complex along the Gowanus Canal.  In a letter sent to David Lichtenstein, the CEO of Lightstone, the councilman wrote: “I believe it would be a serious mistake for you to proceed as though nothing had happened, without reconsidering or altering your plans, and putting over 1,000 new residents in harm’s way the next time an event of this magnitude occurs.”

Photo: LIGHTSTONE GROUP’S MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT ALONG THE GOWANUS CANAL.

COURTESY LIGHTSTONE GROUP
  1. citylifechange23 reblogged this from massurban and added:
    Why are building where future floods might occur? With sea rise?
  2. tomasglobal reblogged this from nickoftimela
  3. noellewilkinson reblogged this from nickoftimela
  4. nickoftimela reblogged this from massurban and added:
    Build it.
  5. massurban posted this
Architectural + Urban Research

Mass Urban is a multidisciplinary design-research initiative concerned with contemporary cities and urbanism. Mass Urban was co-founded in April 2011 by David Lee and Cliff Lau.

Website: http://www.massurban.com/
FB: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Mass-Urban/129166763835571

twitter.com/mass_urban

view archive



Ask me anything

Submit